Trudeau’s criticism will cost Canada ‘a lot of money’

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Canada's prime minister earned Trump's ire by giving a press conference, after the United States president left La Malbaie, in which he spoke critically of U.S. trade policy and said Canada would "move forward with retaliatory measures" in response to Trump's move to impose tariffs on aluminum and steel.

Trudeau told reporters that Canada would move forward on July 1 with retaliatory tariffs to answer for Trump's tariffs on aluminum and steel that were "unjustly applied to us". "And that's what bad-faith Justin Trudeau did with that stunt news conference".

"Canada does not believe that ad hominem attacks are a particularly appropriate or useful way to conduct our relations with other countries", Freeland said.

The House of Commons unanimously supported a motion presented by New Democratic Pary (NDP) MP Tracey Ramsey, condemning the US actions given the "longstanding, mutually-beneficial trading relationship".

The US President gave a press conference at the seat of the summit in the Canadian town of La Malbaie shortly before he left the meeting to head for Singapore, where on June 12 he will meet with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, Efe reported. Trump tweeted on Sunday.

Navarro, for his part, suggested that he was following orders - but made a poor choice of words in doing so.

"My job was to send a signal of strength".

'I used language that was inappropriate and basically lost the power of that message, ' says Navarro. "I own that, that was my mistake, my words", he said at a Journal conference.


Mr. Trump, though, said conversations were cordial and respectful at the summit.

On Tuesday, Trump kept up the attack on Trudeau.

On Tuesday Trump reiterated his belief that the United States is "being taken advantage of by virtually every one" of the countries in the G7. "I really did. Other than he had a news conference that he had cause he assumed I was in an airplane and I wasn't watching". Some of Trump's aides also lashed out at the Canadian prime minister.

We have to stand behind our prime minister - just as we did many years ago - in steadfastly placing blame where it deserves to be, and that's in Washington.

The president has made a lot of noise at this year's G7 event in the Quebec town of La Malbaie - first by launching a Twitter attack on Canada's trade policies before the summit and then for suggesting Russian Federation be invited to re-join the alliance.

The United States has alienated Canada and other allies by imposing tariffs on steel and aluminum imports, arguing that they pose a threat to US national security. I think he should apologize to the prime minister. "I had a very good meeting with the G-7. And it won't even be tough".

The backstabbing charge seems over the top, but the White House's contention is that Trudeau ought to have capped the G-7 summit by talking about Trump and the U.S.

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