Launch of NOAA's JPSS-1 slips 24 hours

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The new estimated reset launch window opens tomorrow morning at 1:47 a.m. PST, with the same 66-second window.

The Joint Polar Satellite System-1, or JPPS-1, was designed and built by Boulder's Ball Aerospace, and once it enters polar orbit, it will be known as NOAA-20, feeding National Weather Service models for Boulder's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

JPSS-1, which will be known as NOAA-20 when it reaches polar orbit, will join the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP), a joint NOAA-NASA weather satellite, giving the US the benefit of two, sophisticated polar satellites in the same orbit.

The Joint Polar Satellite System-1, the first in a new series of highly advanced NOAA polar-orbiting satellites, is scheduled to lift off November 10, at 1:47 a.m. PST from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California.

The launch is planned for Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2017, from Space Launch Complex-2 (SLC-2) at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. It covers the globe twice a day, giving a snapshot of all the weather around the world. Sensors aboard the spacecraft will collect measurements of air, ocean, and ground conditions, as well as fire locations, temperatures and water vapor throughout the atmosphere. The Launch Configuration Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) measures the electromagnetic emissions and subjects it to expected electromagnetic radiation that the satellite would experience at the launch site.

Ball also built one of the five instruments on the spacecraft, the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite.


The Delta II rocket's window to launch JPSS-1 into the correct orbit was just over a minute long.

A scheduled early morning launch of a rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base was a no-go. "JPSS will continue this trend". Originally planned as a research and risk-reduction mission in the JPSS series, NOAA has been using Suomi NPP as its primary operational satellite for global weather observations since May 2014.

The new polar orbiter will be much closer in, 500 miles above earth.

The ATMS instrument is the second flight model and is slated to fly on the first JPSS satellite in 2016.

According to the NOAA press report, "JPSS-1, which will be known as NOAA-20 when it reaches polar orbit, will join the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP), a joint NOAA-NASA weather satellite, giving the US the benefit of two, sophisticated polar satellites in the same orbit".

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